How To Get Amazing Content from iWriter

One thing that I get is how painful it can be to find a decent writer for your projects...

I've tried everything from hiring on Craigslist, Upwork & even Fiverr.​

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One site that I'd used sporadically for years was iWriter and that was mainly for PBN Content. It didn't really jump out at me as a place to get quality writers, mainly because it's got a pretty bad rep for quality content in most SEO circles.​

I decided in early August 2016 that I just needed to find a good quality content writer for one of my sites that wasn't going to cost me $100+ per article.

I won't go into the specific reasons of why this site needs to be cost-effective, but let's just say that it's a site that's going to have around 2,000 reviews on. 2,000 X $100 (as a minimum cost) would mean I put $20,000 down on content before even earning a penny.

Well that's just not how I roll...​

So, I decided to find a quality writer from iWriter. Mission impossible had begun, supposedly.​

​Step 1: Cash Money!

The first step is loading your iWriter account up with a load of money... About $200.00 is going to be more than enough as I found my writer around the $110.00 spent mark. Granted I might of got lucky, so leave a little wiggle room.​

​Step 2: Qualify.

The second step was to start qualifying writers, so I submitted some projects to a variety of different writer 'rating' groups.

Give them an article that you know will require a little research in order to complete...

I wanted to test these writers, so I knew I needed to give them a bit of a challenge to test not only their writing ability, but their ability to research and work hard.​

In my instructions all I said was the following:

Please don't use any duplicate content, the content must be unique (no spinning either). You can use Google to draw inspiration from the top 10 ranking sites for the provided keyword/s.

I didn't want to be more specific than this, mainly because it's a good test of a writers intelligence and common-sense (or ability to take the initiative).

If you're too specific you wind up risking not really knowing whether a writer is going to be able to handle complex assignments. This makes progressing to step 3 virtually impossible.

The other benefit of the instructions I used is that you're familiarizing a writer with what you expect, and what you're okay with.

​Step 3: Review & Assign.

Once you get the articles back, start reviewing them and add prospect writers to your favorites list. In total I added about 4 writers to my list out of 20 articles that I requested.

The next thing I did was message them, and ask them if they'd be interested in handling a special project. I let them know that if they did a good job, there'd be plenty more projects over the coming months.

All of the writers predictably sounded thrilled about this, so I assigned all 4 of them with the exact same project. I sent them a content template that I had written up for the site I was planning to add the content to.

My instructions were essentially the same as before, except; "Please format the article and follow the guidelines as instructed in the content template provided."

I asked for 1000 words in this case, which was a bit more than the 500 words I requested initially.

​Step 4: Review Again.

This time I got the articles back, I noted how long it took each writer to return the article to me as any more than a few days were no good for my needs with just 1,000 words since the final articles I wanted for my site would range between 2,000 and 3,000 words.

I wanted to make sure that the writer could at least provide me with one thoroughly researched, well-written article per week.

Of the 4 writers, only one did a good enough job in a timely fashion that I was happy with what I received.

This article was very thoroughly researched, it followed my instructions to the letter and the actual writing ability was definitely there as I'd made sure of this in the early qualifying phase.

​Step 5: Tip & Assign.

If someone's done a good job, don't be a bastard. Tip them.

In the long run this is going to do wonders for your working relationship. It's just the decent thing to do in my opinion.

So I tipped the writer and sent them a message asking for the same article, expanded to 2,000 words.

I paid them $30.00 and within 5 days I had my 2,000 word article for way less than it would have cost me elsewhere for the same quality. They actually over-delivered with the content, so this was extra proof that I had picked the right person. The qualifying process certainly seems to have worked wonderfully!

how to get a great writer on iwriter

Now I've just sent them their first 3,000 word article which is going to cost me a very cost-effective $45.00. It also doesn't feel bad when you get complimented as being a great requester.

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Daniel

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